I am Justin Tadlock. Ask me anything


(Justin Tadlock) #1

A few things about me:

I’m in my 10th year of using WordPress and 7th year of running a theme/plugin business (Theme Hybrid). I co-authored Professional WordPress Plugin Development and recently joined ThemeReview.co to professionally review themes. I’m also an admin for the WordPress.org theme review team.

I’m passionate about a lot of things outside of WordPress. Gardening, blending traditional living with the benefit of modern advancements, reading, TV/movies, writing, the political landscape in the U.S., and many other things make up just a small portion of my interests. I tend to be more of a Renaissance man rather than specializing in one area, which is probably the norm for a lot of folks in the Web development field.

Proof: https://twitter.com/justintadlock/status/559499904566198273


The February 2015 WPChat AMA guest is lined up
The March 2015 AMA is Sarah Gooding
(Leland Fiegel) #2

I guess I’ll get the ball rolling!

So about a year ago (December 2013) you had a successful crowdfunding campaign to get a house for Christmas to start a small homestead.

Fast forward to a year later, how’s that going?


#3

What’s your favorite Halo game?


(Justin Tadlock) #4

It’s good now. I spent a large part of this year staying near my grandparents to help them through a tough transition. But, I’m finally getting to settle in.


(Justin Tadlock) #5

Halo 4 for the gameplay itself. Halo 2 though is still awesome all these years later, so that’s probably the best to me. There are great things about them all though.


(Leland Fiegel) #6

So you were an English teacher in South Korea for some period of time (not sure how long). Do you see yourself returning to teach English again at some point in the future?


#7

Hi, just short question :wink:
3 plugins, 3 themes, 3 wp sites, 3 anything
…why?


(Justin Tadlock) #8

I almost did start teaching again a few years ago. But, the deal with the Pro WP Plugin Dev book came to me at about the same time. So, I made the choice to go with the book than pursue teaching at the time.

I think I might return to it when I’m a bit older though.


(Justin Tadlock) #9

I don’t follow. Three of something is always better than two??


(Justin Tadlock) #10

Also, I taught for 14 months in Korea.


(Sarah Gooding) #11

Lots of folks like to talk about how Post Formats are dead/dying. Do you like post formats? Do you think they have a future?


(Justin Tadlock) #12

I love post formats. They’ve really been around for as long as I’ve been using WP (anyone remember Matt’s asides?). I think the initial build was put in too soon, so it’s created some problems for theme authors. I feel like I’ve overcome most of those issues with the post formats-related code in Hybrid Core.

Edit: For a little history: http://ma.tt/2004/05/asides/


(Leland Fiegel) #13

Has Discourse (for those that aren’t aware, is the software that powers WPChat) been the source of any inspiration for your own forum plugin?


(Justin Tadlock) #14

I’m honestly not a huge fan of Discourse. :slight_smile: Whatever works for discussion though is what’s best for a site.

I’ve been members of several sites in the past that used PHPBB, so that’s a big inspiration. I’ve also used bbPress (the software, not plugin) on my own sites for years, so I have the most familiarity with it. I’ve probably looked at 20+ for inspiration and ideas in recent months.


(Justin Tadlock) #15

Overall, a forum plugin for WP needs to have its own feel. It’s part WordPress, part forum. It’s definitely going to have a different feel in some respects to dedicated forum software.


(Richard) #16

Lately there has been a lot of chatter about “headless” CMSes. A great many PHP and front end devs that I know seem to think that WordPress themes aren’t “doing it right” when they compare them with, say, templating for PSR style frameworks like Symfony. What are your thoughts/feelings about only using WP only as an editorial friendly back end, bypassing “standard” WordPress themes to build front ends with Symfony, Twig, and other “modern PHP” technologies and standards instead?


(Justin Tadlock) #17

The great thing about WordPress theme dev is that you don’t have to be an awesome programmer to get into it. Basic PHP + HTML is well documented across the Web. WordPress isn’t used by so many people around the world just because of its publishing experience. It’s easy to bring in new devs.

The barrier to entry is what it’s all about.


(Justin Tadlock) #18

Just to add to that. I think there’s a lot of neat stuff going on, and we should definitely be learning from those things and implementing them when it makes sense.


(Nikhil Vimal) #19

What is one thing you think people should integrate into a theme that many don’t integrate now?


(Justin Tadlock) #20

Hybrid Core, my framework. :smile:

Really, I don’t think there’s one answer. I think people put too much stuff in themes nowadays. Themes should be made for a specific purpose. Whatever that purpose is decides what belongs in the theme.